How to use Discernment

Due to the wealth of data and information flooding the Internet, it can be extremely difficult to discern truth from fiction. What is definitely true, however, is that we can’t only use our intellect and believe that this is enough. At times even more important than the left-brain intellect is intuition and what I sometimes call inner discernment. When evaluating data and information most people only use their logical/analytical mind and forget that they need to add intuition, including body reactions, into the equation. Only if we do all of this and become good at it and sensitive enough to it, can we more easily discern good information from disinformation. The disinformation campaigns these days are so cleverly done that using our intellect is definitely not enough. This is why some highly intelligent people still can’t see beyond what’s in front of their eyes — they evaluate data only from a physical perspective; if it can’t be proven with the five senses, it’s not valid. These people miss out on the entire metaphysical spectrum.

However, as a rule of thumb, be critical of everything you hear and read from mainstream society and media. Then be even more critical of anyone who is exposing mainstream society and media. Always look for potential hidden agendas, such as gaining trust amongst alternative researchers and truth-seekers, only to later add disinformation to the soup. Finally, be most critical of yourself and do not believe something because you want to believe. Look for motives in everything. When these criteria are met, there might be some new insights to gain.

There is nothing wrong with gathering information from mainstream media, but we need to be able to use discernment and always look for hidden motives, messages, and manipulation — it’s almost always there, if we really look. We can also, as I have done in this book, use mainstream media to expose the media. Always be aware, however, that mainstream media is never independent and in public service; they are always running someone else’s errands, and much of the news we hear is encoded and only understood to its full extent by Insiders. These Insiders often use media to communicate hidden messages.​

Next page: Intuition


© 2016 Wes Penre (main website)